Author Archives: Jordan Doyle

 
 

Dollar Day survival guide

It’s that time of year again at the Zoo—Dollar Day! This annual summer day is our way of giving back and saying “thank you” to our amazing community that supports us year-round. While Dollar Day is one of the most exciting days at the Zoo, it’s also one of the busiest. So here are a few tips for you to make the most of your Zoo day:

  • GET HERE EARLY. Parking lots open at 7 a.m. and gates at 9 a.m., but lines will begin forming at the entrances well before that.
  • TAKE THE DART RED LINE RIGHT TO OUR DOOR. Parking is limited, and with the attendance we expect on Dollar Day, public transportation is such a great alternative to driving personal vehicles.
  • COME WITH A PLAN. Take a look at a map of the Zoo before you come and figure out your plan for the day. Consider which half of the Zoo you want to visit first: Wilds of Africa (hippos, giraffes, elephants, lions, Gorilla Trail) or ZooNorth (Children’s Zoo, reptiles, tiger, monkeys, etc.). Also consider which keeper chats you want to attend and which Wonders of the Wild show you want to catch. At 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 3 p.m., and 4 p.m., you can experience our interactive 20-minute wildlife show in ZooNorth.
  • PREPARE FOR THE WEATHER. The forecast calls for sun, with temps over 100 degrees. Don’t forget to bring your sunscreen and to stay hydrated throughout the day!
  • PACK YOUR PATIENCE. The Zoo is going to be crowded. This day is always one of our busiest. Please be patient if you encounter lines and please be nice to your fellow visitors.
  • SPEAK UP IF YOU NEED HELP. If you have a question, problem, or just need directions, please find a uniformed staffer and ask for help. We’re here to make sure you have the best experience!

If you get hungry during your Zooventure, not to worry. We have $2 hot dogs, chips, and sodas, and $1 canned water available for purchase. Sponsored by Oncor, MetroPCS, and Children’s Health, Dollar Day is going to be a busy day full of fun. Can’t wait to see you there!

Categories: Dollar Day, Events | Tags: , | Leave a comment
 
 

Students take talent to top photographer camp

The Zoo’s a great place for budding photographers (and experienced ones, too). Our Top Photographer summer camp gives children an opportunity to test out their wildlife photography skills in our 106-acre zoological park. Last month, a group of lucky student campers were trained by our expert staff photographer and given an up-close experience with animals. After two weeks of trekking through the Zoo and patiently waiting for just the right shot, here are some of our winning photos:

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Top Photographer: Morgan
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Categories: Education, Photography, Uncategorized | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Crafting cranes for conservation

Dallas Zoo intern Paulina Serra engages guests at one of the whooping crane conservation tables at the Zoo. The intern fundraising campaign runs from July 7 – July 15.

Origami is the simple yet intentional act of folding paper in order to create a delicate piece of art. The practice takes very little material and requires no setup, but according to Dallas Zoo conservation and engagement intern Audrey Silvestre, you need more than just paper. “Origami takes precision and patience,” she says. “A fold that’s a little off can make the final creation look a wonky and lopsided. Being the perfectionist I am, I like to make sure each corner meets the other corner perfectly.”

Her patience has been tested and demonstrated over the past few weeks as she, alongside a group of 48 interns spanning 16 Dallas Zoo departments, has painstakingly crafted more than 1,000 origami cranes in the name of conservation.

Why Cranes?

In Japan, the origami crane is a symbol of hope in challenging times. The belief is, if you are determined enough to craft 1,000 cranes while concentrating on a specific purpose or goal, then your wish can be achieved. The interns took that to heart in honor of the Dallas Zoo’s current conservation focus – support for the endangered whooping crane.

Once upon a time, just 80 years ago, there were only 15 whooping cranes left in the wild. Through concerted conservation efforts, those numbers have slowly grown to almost 800 whooping cranes today in human care and in the wild. But there is still much work to be done before this species is secure.

In response, the Dallas Zoo is on a mission to raise $2.5 million to fund the construction of the Whooping Crane Center of Texas, an off-site whooping crane breeding facility that will be located a few miles from the Zoo. There, we’ll breed whooping cranes for release into the wild and will conduct research to continue to improve wild reintroduction efforts.

How can you help?

Dallas Zoo intern Audrey Silvestre, with a hanging origami crane art piece she created to be sold on-site at the Dallas Zoo this weekend.

Current Dallas Zoo interns have organized a fundraiser, with stations at the Zoo stocked with t-shirts, conservation wristbands, art, stickers, reusable totes, and water bottles, all featuring this amazing bird. Their goal is to raise $10,000 to contribute to the Zoo’s larger capital campaign. While supplies last, anyone who contributes to the fundraiser at the Zoo is gifted one of the interns’ 1,000 paper cranes as a small “thank you” for helping keep the hope alive for this iconic Texas species.

“My knowledge of these beautiful birds has definitely grown a lot since I’ve been here,” Silvestre shares. “It’s sad to know that our actions affect these creatures as well as other wildlife, but together we can definitely make a positive impact.”

There are several ways to get involved to help create a better world for the whooping cranes.

  • Support the interns at the Zoo this weekend by taking part in daily activities from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the ZooNorth Breezeway.
  • Purchase specially designed whooping crane products and original art inspired by cranes and their beauty.
  • Stop by to contribute to our goal of collecting 3,000 pledges for pro-environmental behaviors that benefit whooping cranes.
  • Say yes to “rounding-up for whooping cranes” when you buy something in our Zoofari Market.

If you can’t make it to the Zoo this weekend but still want to help out, you can also submit an electronic donation through paypal.me/DallasZoo. And keep an eye out for more news from the Dallas Zoo about ways you can help support our campaign to build the Whooping Crane Center of Texas!

Categories: Conservation, Interns | Tags: , | Leave a comment
 
 

Spring season springs new chicks

With every spring comes another busy breeding season for Dallas Zoo’s bird team. This year, we’ve had success after success in breeding remarkable, threatened animals. The hatchlings are very carefully planned under recommendations from the Species Survival Plans, coordinated through the Association of Zoos & Aquariums to help ensure the survival of threatened and endangered species. Here are our most recent chicks we’ve welcomed:

African penguins: We’ve had three hatch this spring! Jakada (male) hatched Feb. 26, Zebib (female) on March 5, and another on April 24 (still hasn’t been named yet). You may have seen Jakada’s and Zebib’s first swim recently. We’re now giving them pool time in their habitats for brief periods in the day, and will continue introducing them to the rest of the flock. Stop by their pool in the Wilds of Africa to catch a glimpse of these adorable chicks! (Our last chick to hatch will join the flock in the pool in late July).

Jakada and Zebib shortly after their hatchings.

The April 24 chick after its hatching.

 

 

 

 

 

 

King vulture: Hatched on April 3, this chick is melting hearts in its ZooNorth Wings of Wonder habitat. The little one will eventually develop a very colorful neck and head with varying colors, including yellow, orange, blue, purple, and red.

Southern ground hornbill: This little one was hatched on March 29. Fun fact — these are the “wolves of the bird world,” living in family groups. (In case you missed it, we welcomed our first-ever flock of chicks last year. This is a must-watch video!)

Yellow-billed storks: We hatched six of these chicks this season. This group is currently behind the scenes, but will most likely be in their habitat soon. These storks are a particularly big deal for us because we’re the only AZA-accredited zoo hatching them right now.

Marabou storks: Two of these chicks hatched this season, one on Jan. 30 and one on May 6. The first chick is in its habitat on the Gorilla Trail, and our second chick remains behind the scenes. We’re proud to care for one of the largest flocks of marabou stock in North America!

Hooded vulture: Hatched on May 16, this chick is currently on habitat in Wings of Wonder. Our other chick hatched May 22 and is in the saddle-billed stork habitat near Simmons Hippo Outpost. Check out the live-streaming “nestcam” video near the habitat to see this chick!

Hatching season still isn’t done! We still have more to share, including some hatchlings that are a first for us. Stay posted for more!

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Dallas Zoo welcomes its first baby gorilla in 20 years

A close up of Hope’s sleeping baby./June 25

Dallas Zoo staff are smiling big after welcoming our first baby gorilla in 20 years on Monday, June 25. This also marks the fifth baby gorilla the zoo has cared for in nearly 50 years.

Our 22-year-old critically endangered western lowland gorilla named Hope quietly delivered the infant last Monday morning in the gorilla

barn after laboring for just over an hour. Hope and the baby are both doing well. Mom is tired but she’s tending to the infant perfectly, and the baby appears to be strong – gripping onto mom, and nursing frequently.

Baby was holding onto mom on its own (as it should) immediately after birth.

Silverback Subira, a first-time father, was the first member of the troop to greet the baby, gently putting his lips on the infant’s head shortly after birth.

“Welcoming a critically endangered gorilla into our family is one of the most significant animal announcements we can make, and we’ve

waited patiently for 20 years for this moment,” said Gregg Hudson, Dallas Zoo’s President and CEO. “We’ve dedicated years of conservation field work to saving gorillas in the wild and now we’re proudly increasing their numbers in human care. We’re truly beaming with pride. ”

This is Hope’s second baby – she delivered her first in 2004 at the ABQ BioPark Zoo in Albuquerque, NM. Hope arrived at the Dallas Zoo in February 2017 on an Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ (AZA) Species Survival Plan breeding recommendation in *hopes* of increasing the population in North America.

“It’s taken a lot of perseverance, the right chemistry, and a team of dedicated animal experts to get here,” said Harrison Edell, Executive Vice President of Animal Care and Conservation. “Reproducing critically endangered species is no easy feat, and this moment doesn’t come without its share of obstacles. We’re feeling a ton of emotions – excitement, relief, gratitude – and now we have to ensure this infant grows into a successful member of our gorilla troop.”

The zoo cares for nine gorillas, including its bachelor troop who live on the south side of the Gorilla Trail, and the family troop who live on the north side. The family troop remains behind the scenes where Hope and her baby are bonding privately. Hope continues to keep her baby close, so keepers have not been able to definitively confirm the gender.

Twenty-two-year-old father Subira is very curious of the infant and calmly investigates the little one; 13-year-old female Megan is the most inquisitive, staying very close to Hope; and 21-year-old female Shanta is extremely respectful of Hope, giving her privacy and space.

“It’s incredible to see how our troop is reacting to the baby – they’re all managing well and Hope has been super patient with their presence,” said Keith Zdrojewski, Dallas Zoo’s Curator of Primates and Carnivores. “Hope’s pregnancy lasted 8.5 months and we were able to monitor the baby’s growth along the way through ultrasound. Keepers trained Hope to voluntarily participate in her own health care, allowing us to observe movement; hear the heartbeat; see the infant’s bladder, spine, appendages; and confirm when its head was down.”

Due to habitat destruction, poaching for bush meat and the animal trafficking trade, and disease, gorillas have never been under greater threat in the wild. According to the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International, the world’s leading gorilla conservation organization and a Dallas Zoo partner, there are approximately 350,000 western lowland gorillas left in Africa.

Native to the Congo Basin, western lowland gorillas are the smallest of the subspecies and the least critically endangered. There are roughly 3,800 Grauer’s gorillas, 880 mountain gorillas, and 300 Cross River gorillas remaining in the wild.

With 295 western lowland gorillas living in AZA-accredited zoos, the nation’s top zoos have never been more committed to protecting this species in human care and in their native habitat.

Baby rests while Hope eats (note mom’s food droppings).

The Dallas Zoo has supported gorilla conservation for many years. A species that is close to our President and CEO’s heart, Hudson is the immediate past chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund, where he’s been a member since 2007. He serves on the board of directors for the Gorilla Rehabilitation and Conservation Education Center (GRACE), as well. Zdrojewski is also on GRACE’s Animal Care and Welfare Advisory Group – he helped the organization open a one-of-a-kind forest enclosure in the Congo for its orphaned Grauer’s gorillas in 2015.

Our animal care team aims for Hope and her baby to make their first scheduled public appearance within the next week or so. We will share the date on our social media pages, so stay posted!

Categories: Africa, Conservation, Gorilla | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

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